The Best Places for Stargazing Around the World

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This is what happens when you reply to spam email | James Veitch

Suspicious emails: unclaimed insurance bonds, diamond-encrusted safe deposit boxes, close friends marooned in a foreign country. They pop up in our inboxes, and standard procedure is to delete on sight. But what happens when you reply? Follow along as writer and comedian James Veitch narrates a hilarious, months-long exchange with a spammer who offered to cut him in on a hot deal. TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and much more. Find closed captions and translated subtitles in many languages at http://www.ted.com/translate Follow TED news on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/tednews Like TED on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TED Subscribe to our channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/TEDtalksDirector

Stargazing Basics 1: Learn how get oriented in the night sky for stargazing

Want to know more about the basics of astronomy? Learn how to orient yourself in the night sky for beginning astronomy, starting with the cardinal directions, and moving through the concepts of the meridian, zenith, ecliptic, celestial sphere, celestial equator and celestial pole - all in a friendly, easy-to-understand presentation. #withcaptions

How the Universe Works - Blow your Mind of the Universe - Space Discovery Documentary

The Big Bang theory is the prevailing cosmological model for the universe from the earliest known periods through its subsequent large-scale evolution. The model accounts for the fact that the universe expanded from a very high density and high temperature state, and offers a comprehensive explanation faor a broad range of phenomena, including the abundance of light elements, the cosmic microwave background, large scale structure and Hubble's Law.If the known laws of physics are extrapolated to the highest density regime, the result is a singularity which is typically associated with the Big Bang. Detailed measurements of the expansion rate of the universe place this moment at approximately 13.8 billion years ago, which is thus considered the age of the universe. After the initial expansion, the universe cooled sufficiently to allow the formation of subatomic particles, and later simple atoms. Giant clouds of these primordial elements later coalesced through gravity in halos of dark matter, eventually forming the stars and galaxies visible today. Timeline of the metric expansion of space, where space (including hypothetical non-observable portions of the universe) is represented at each time by the circular sections. On the left the dramatic expansion occurs in the inflationary epoch, and at the center the expansion accelerates (artist's concept; not to scale). Since Georges Lemaître first noted in 1927 that an expanding universe could be traced back in time to an originating single point, scientists have built on his idea of cosmic expansion. While the scientific community was once divided between supporters of two different expanding universe theories, the Big Bang and the Steady State theory, empirical evidence provides strong support for the former.[8] In 1929, from analysis of galactic redshifts, Edwin Hubble concluded that galaxies are drifting apart; this is important observational evidence consistent with the hypothesis of an expanding universe. In 1965 the cosmic microwave background radiation was discovered, which was crucial evidence in favor of the Big Bang model,[9] since that theory predicted the existence of background radiation throughout the universe before it was discovered. More recently, measurements of the redshifts of supernovae indicate that the expansion of the universe is accelerating, an observation attributed to dark energy's existence.[10] The known physical laws of nature can be used to calculate the characteristics of the universe in detail back in time to an initial state of extreme density and temperature.[11] The Big Bang theory developed from observations of the structure of the universe and from theoretical considerations. In 1912 Vesto Slipher measured the first Doppler shift of a "spiral nebula" (spiral nebula is the obsolete term for spiral galaxies), and soon discovered that almost all such nebulae were receding from Earth. He did not grasp the cosmological implications of this fact, and indeed at the time it was highly controversial whether or not these nebulae were "island universes" outside our Milky Way.[37][38] Ten years later, Alexander Friedmann, a Russian cosmologist and mathematician, derived the Friedmann equations from Albert Einstein's equations of general relativity, showing that the universe might be expanding in contrast to the static universe model advocated by Einstein at that time.[39] In 1924 Edwin Hubble's measurement of the great distance to the nearest spiral nebulae showed that these systems were indeed other galaxies. Independently deriving Friedmann's equations in 1927, Georges Lemaître, a Belgian physicist and Roman Catholic priest, proposed that the inferred recession of the nebulae was due to the expansion of the universe.[40] In 1931 Lemaître went further and suggested that the evident expansion of the universe, if projected back in time, meant that the further in the past the smaller the universe was, until at some finite time in the past all the mass of the universe was concentrated into a single point, a "primeval atom" where and when the fabric of time and space came into existence.[41] Starting in 1924, Hubble painstakingly developed a series of distance indicators, the forerunner of the cosmic distance ladder, using the 100-inch (2.5 m) Hooker telescope at Mount Wilson Observatory. #Universe #Space #Documentary

Telescope Basics 1 (of 6): Top three telescope types explained

Hosted by David Fuller of "Eyes on the Sky," this video covers the the three basic types of amateur astronomy telescopes: Refractors, reflectors and compound telescopes. It gives an overview of each one, as well as comparing and contrasting the advantages and disadvantages of each type of design. An excellent primer for anyone wanting to understand more about telescopes. #withcaptions

10 Most Dangerous Places In The World

We recommend staying away from these 10 places! Visit our site: http://TopTrending.com Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TopTrending Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/TopTrending Commentator: http://www.youtube.com/user/BaerTaffy Music: Crime Thriller & Gritty Crime http://themeforest.net/item/crime-thriller/11542086 http://themeforest.net/item/gritty-crime/11729692 1. JUAREZ VALLEY, MEXICO 2. YUNGAS ROAD, BOLIVIA 3. ISTANBUL, TURKEY 4. LAKE KIVU 5. SAN PEDRO SULA, HONDURAS 6. ILHA DA QUEIMADA GRANDE (SNAKE ISLAND) 7. MOUNT HUA, CHINA 8. DANAKIL DESERT, ETHIOPIA 9. MAYAK, RUSSIA 10. CAMDEN, NJ 10 Most Dangerous Places In The World

If you want to enjoy the amazing view stars provide, we have the best locations around the world for some truly jaw-dropping cosmic sights.

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