Worlds most dangerous & beautiful road , shimla to manali , himachalpradesh , India

author Solo traveller sajith ok   4 год. назад
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17 Most Unreal Rock Formations

Tourist from all over the world travel to these amazing destinations to see the strange but beautiful rock formations nature has made. Subscribe to Talltanic http://goo.gl/wgfvrr #10 Salt Piles at Salar de Uyuni Salar de Uyuni, the world’s largest salt flat, is one of the most distinct natural landmarks in the world. The immense plains of salt are viewable from space and are a huge attraction for tourists and photographers. After rainfall, the plains turn into an enormous reflective mirror that creates a surreal landscape. The piles of salt ready for harvest only add to the uncanny imagery. # 9 Giant’s Causeway The Giant’s Causeway is a huge oceanside area in Northern Ireland comprised of giant interlocking columns of basalt rock. Most of the columns are hexagonal in shape and perfectly fit together creating a surreal almost game-like environment. Scientifically speaking the columns were created by an ancient volcanic explosion, but it gains its name from the popular legend that the cliffs were built as a causeway by a giant in ancient times. # 8 Balance Rock In the Garden of Gods in Colorado Springs there are a plethora of beautiful red rock formations, but possibly the most iconic of these rocks is Balance Rock - a huge boulder that seems like it could fall over at any moment. It is destined to fall over eventually when erosion or another damage dislodges it from its gripping points. Go and see Balance Rock before it falls over and becomes just a normal rock. # 7 Balancing Rock, Canada There is another precarious rock, but this seems to be even more impossible. The Balancing Rock in Nova Scotia is believed to be standing for thousands of years. It’s about 30 feet tall and seems to be just standing straight up out of pure will. # 6 Fly Geyser This erupting rock is Fly Geyser, an accidental man-made geothermal geyser in Washoe County. The fountain was created in 1964 when people were exploring sources of geothermal energy and accidentally drilled into a well. The well was never capped properly and has now become a geyser that shoots water into the air, creating the ever growing rock formation around it. It looks like a weird alien structure because of thermophilic algae that thrive in the high temperatures Fly Geyser generates. # 5 Split Apple Rock Tokangawhā, aka Split Apple Rock, is a geological rock formation off the coast of South Island of New Zealand. It is a structure made of granite and looks almost like it was deliberately cut in half. This cleft was natural, though, with no help from any humans. What exactly could have cut this boulder in half is a mystery although theories include water creeping into the rock, freezing, and expanding to break the rock. It’s a popular spot for tourists to take the exact same photo every year. # 4 Moeraki Boulders The Moeraki Boulders are unusually large and spherical boulders that are spread along Koekohe Beach on the Otago coast of New Zealand. Local Maori legends explain the boulders as the remains of eel baskets from the large sailing canoe that brought Maori people to the island hundreds of years ago. These stones are usually hollow but sometimes they are filled with calcite and quartz, which makes it look very interesting when they are broken open or exposed. # 3 Folding Rocks at Agia Pavlos These interesting looking rocks are known commonly as the Folding Rocks. They are sedimentary limestone layers were once layered horizontally at the bottom of the sea, but tectonic plates pushed them together and forced them upwards. # 2 Torghatten Torghatten is a granite mountain on Torget island in Norway. As far as mountains go it looks pretty uncharacteristic and lumpy except for the giant gaping hole right in the middle of it. According to legend, the mountain hole was made by a troll who was chasing a beautiful girl. Knowing he could never catch the girl he shot an arrow at her, but the Troll King threw his hat to save her and that hat turned into the mountain. Sounds pretty legit to me. # 1 Abandoned Russian Salt Mine This abandoned Russian Salt Mine looks more like a scene from a trippy art house movie. The naturally occurring minerals in the abandoned mine create psychedelic patterns and structures which create unique swirls. While the naturally occurring art in these walls are beautiful, exploring the mines are not without danger. There are hazards of falling, landslides, and low visibility, but it might be worth facing to see this one of a kind place.

How To Harvest Banana? - Banana Harvesting & Farming

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Lukla Airport... Takeoff & Landing November 5, 2016

Lukla Airport takeoff and landing.

LEH LADAKH, INDIA, MUST WATCH SKILL FULL DRIVING IN ZOJILA PASS, VIDEO BY PRASHANT OAK, NAGPUR

oak_prashant@yahoo.co.in

SUPER POWERFUL Russian military off road 4WD Trucks

Russian military unveils new off road four wheel drive trucks. A truck (United States, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, also[1] called a lorry in the United Kingdom and Ireland) is a motor vehicle designed to transport cargo. Trucks vary greatly in size, power, and configuration, with the smallest being mechanically similar to an automobile. Commercial trucks can be very large and powerful, and may be configured to mount specialized equipment, such as in the case of fire trucks and concrete mixers and suction excavators. Modern trucks are largely powered by diesel engines exclusively, although small to medium size trucks with gasoline engines exist in the US. In the European Union, vehicles with a gross combination mass of up to 3,500 kilograms (7,716 lb) are known as light commercial vehicles, and those over as large goods vehicles. History[edit] The oldest truck was built in 1896 by Gottlieb Daimler.[2] The first truck in the United States was built by Autocar in 1899 and was available with optional 5 or 8 horsepower motors.[3] Terminology[edit] Etymology[edit] The word "truck" might come from a back-formation of "truckle" with the meaning "small wheel", "pulley", from Middle English trokell, in turn from Latin trochlea. Another explanation is that it comes from Latin trochus with the meaning of "iron hoop". In turn, both go back to Greek trokhos (τροχός) meaning "wheel" from trekhein (τρέχειν, "to run"). The first known usage of "truck" was in 1611 when it referred to the small strong wheels on ships' cannon carriages. In its extended usage it came to refer to carts for carrying heavy loads, a meaning known since 1771. With the meaning of "motor-powered load carrier", it has been in usage since 1930, shortened from "motor truck", which dates back to 1916.[4][5] "Lorry" has a more uncertain origin, but probably has its roots in the rail transport industry, where the word is known to have been used in 1838 to refer to a type of truck (a freight car as in British usage, not a bogie as in the American), specifically a large flat wagon. It probably derives from the verb lurry (to pull, tug) of uncertain origin. With the meaning of "self-propelled vehicle for carrying goods" it has been in usage since 1911.[6][7] Before that, the word "lorry" was used for a sort of big horse-drawn goods wagon. International variance In the United States, Canada, and the Philippines "truck" is usually reserved for commercial vehicles larger than normal cars, and includes pickups and other vehicles having an open load bed. In Australia, New Zealand and South Africa, the word "truck" is mostly reserved for larger vehicles; in Australia and New Zealand, a pickup truck is usually called a ute (short for "utility"), while in South Africa it is called a bakkie (Afrikaans: "small open container"). In the United Kingdom, India, Malaysia, Singapore, Ireland and Hong Kong lorry is used instead of truck, but only for the medium and heavy types. In American English, the word "truck" is often preceded by a word describing the type of vehicle, such as a "tanker truck". In British English these would be referred to as a "tanker" or "petrol tanker". In Australia and New Zealand, the term ute (short for coupé utility) is used to describe a pickup truck with an open cargo carrying space but a front similar to a passenger car, and which requires only a passenger car licence to drive. The concept was developed in 1933 by Lewis Bandt of the Ford Motor Company in Geelong following a request from a Gippsland farmer's wife for a vehicle that they could go to church in on Sunday without getting wet and also use to take the pigs to market on Monday.[9] Driving[edit] In many countries, driving a truck requires a special driving license. The requirements and limitations vary with each different jurisdiction. Australia[edit] In Australia, a truck driver's license is required for any motor vehicle with a Gross Vehicle Mass (GVM) exceeding 4,500 kilograms (9,921 lb). The motor vehicles classes are further expanded as: LR: Light rigid: a rigid vehicle with a GVM of more than 4,500 kilograms (9,921 lb) but not more than 8,000 kilograms (17,637 lb). Any towed trailer must not weigh more than 9,000 kilograms (19,842 lb) GVM. MR: Medium rigid: a rigid vehicle with 2 axles and a GVM of more than 8,000 kilograms (17,637 lb). Any towed trailer must not weigh more than 9,000 kilograms (19,842 lb) GVM. Also includes vehicles in class LR. HR: Heavy Rigid: a rigid vehicle with three or more axles and a GVM of more than 8,000 kilograms (17,637 lb)). Any towed trailer must not weigh more than 9,000 kilograms (19,842 lb)) GVM. Also includes articulated buses and vehicles in class MR. HC: Heavy Combination, a typical prime mover plus semi-trailer combination. MC: Multi Combination e.g., B Doubles/road trains.

Worlds most dangerous road

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