Where does your fruit come from and at what cost? | DW Documentary

author DW Documentary   6 мес. назад
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Avocado - a positive superfood trend? | DW Documentary

From avocado toast to guacamole, this superfood has stolen the hearts of foodies and the health conscious around the world. But where do avocados come from? Avocados have become a huge food trend in the Western world, where the creamy fruit has become readily available in shops, cafes and restaurants. The avocado is considered a superfood and is popular in Europe because of its nutritional value. Avocados are high in calories, contain mostly monounsaturated fat and are good for cholesterol. The fruit is full of essential nutrients, including potassium and vitamin C. But there's a darker side to the fashionable fruit popular on toast or in salads. In Chile, one of the world's largest suppliers, avocado cultivation has dramatic consequences and has been linked to water shortages, human rights violations and an environmentally damage. The province of Petorca has a long tradition of avocado farming. Once grown by small farmers, production has been soaring since the global avocado boom of the 1990s. Big landowners now dominate the avocado market there. And their business requires large amounts of water. It takes up to 1000 liters of water to grow one kilo of the fruit (about three avocados) - a lot more than for a kilo of tomatoes or potatoes. The region is suffering an acute water shortage, exacerbated by climate change. The riverbeds dried up years ago. Trucks bring tanks of water to families in need, while thousands of hectares of avocado groves just next door are watered with artificial reservoirs. Rodrigo Mundaca founded the NGO Modatima. He fights for the right to water - a right that’s guaranteed by the UN and that Chile has committed to. An aerial survey in 2012 revealed that 64 pipelines were diverting river water underground, apparently to irrigate the avocado fields. When the Modatima activists publicly voiced their criticism, they received death threats. Water became a commodity in Chile in 1981 under the Pinochet dictatorship, meaning it’s privatized. Those who offer the most money get water licenses, even for life, regardless of the potential consequences for the ecosystem. The avocado also has a pretty dire environmental footprint. They’re packaged to prevent damage and transported in air-conditioned cargo ships to Europe. The fruit then ripens in a factory in Rotterdam, before it’s sent "ready to eat” to German supermarkets. "Europe wants to eat healthily - at our expense,” says Mundaca. _______ Exciting, powerful and informative – DW Documentary is always close to current affairs and international events. Our eclectic mix of award-winning films and reports take you straight to the heart of the story. Dive into different cultures, journey across distant lands, and discover the inner workings of modern-day life. Subscribe and explore the world around you – every day, one DW Documentary at a time. Subscribe to DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/dwdocumentary?sub_confirmation=1 For more information visit: http://www.dw.com/en/tv/docfilm/s-3610 Instagram https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories DW netiquette policy: http://www.dw.com/en/dws-netiquette-policy/a-5300954

Farmed Norwegian Salmon World’s Most Toxic Food

A look into farmed Salmon and Asian Panga. Buy wild Alaskan Salmon https://www.vitalchoice.com/?idaffiliate=527871

Too much milk in Europe | DW Documentary

Europe produces too much milk. The surplus milk is processed by the ton into powdered milk for export to Africa. The results can be disastrous. African milk farmers simply cannot compete with European price dumping. Our agricultural exports torpedo all development efforts. European dairy products sell for next to nothing – it’s just one of the consequences of the crisis that has been raging since the abolition of milk quotas in 2015. Never before was milk so cheap in our supermarkets: European farmers have reacted to falling prices with rising production. But what happens to what is not sold here? Export is the magic word for policy makers in German agriculture. For countries like Cameroon, the wave of milk washing over it from Europe is a disaster. These developments stifle promising approaches within the country’s dairy sector. Dairies, some of them even funded with European development aid, lie empty because the farmers refuse to deliver milk to them. They know that their milk has no chance against the indirectly subsidized produce from Europe. "It’s not fair”, says Hayatou El Hadji Souley, dairy farmer in Cameroon. "We should be increasing our home production in order to improve people’s lives here”. That is exactly what German politicians are calling for, too. They want conditions to improve in Africa so that economic migrants won’t feel obliged to come to Europe. Our documentary shows that European dumping prices are the opposite of what Cameroon needs to have a healthy dairy industry. _______ Exciting, powerful and informative – DW Documentary is always close to current affairs and international events. Our eclectic mix of award-winning films and reports take you straight to the heart of the story. Dive into different cultures, journey across distant lands, and discover the inner workings of modern-day life. Subscribe and explore the world around you – every day, one DW Documentary at a time. Subscribe to DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCW39zufHfsuGgpLviKh297Q?sub_confirmation=1# For more information visit: https://www.dw.com/documentaries Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories

Fast food chicken: Testing Subway, McDonald's, A&W, Wendy's & Tim Hortons (CBC Marketplace)

We test grilled chicken sandwiches from Subway, McDonald's, A&W, Wendy's and Tim Hortons to find out how much chicken is in that chicken. Watch more: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uvdO0TJXjdc&list=PLeyJPHbRnGaZmzkCwy3-8ykUZm_8B9kKM Get our newsletter http://cbc.ca/marketplace/watchdog Like us on Facebook: http://facebook.com/cbcmarketplace »»» Subscribe to CBC News to watch more videos: http://bit.ly/1RreYWS Connect with CBC News Online: For breaking news, video, audio and in-depth coverage: http://bit.ly/1Z0m6iX Find CBC News on Facebook: http://bit.ly/1WjG36m Follow CBC News on Twitter: http://bit.ly/1sA5P9H For breaking news on Twitter: http://bit.ly/1WjDyks Follow CBC News on Instagram: http://bit.ly/1Z0iE7O Download the CBC News app for iOS: http://apple.co/25mpsUz Download the CBC News app for Android: http://bit.ly/1XxuozZ »»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»» For more than 75 years, CBC News has been the source Canadians turn to, to keep them informed about their communities, their country and their world. Through regional and national programming on multiple platforms, including CBC Television, CBC News Network, CBC Radio, CBCNews.ca, mobile and on-demand, CBC News and its internationally recognized team of award-winning journalists deliver the breaking stories, the issues, the analyses and the personalities that matter to Canadians.

Tokyo's Secret Island Paradise | AOGASHIMA ★ ONLY in JAPAN

Jurassic Park may be the first thing that comes to mind when you see Aogashima Island from the air - but yes, THIS IS TOKYO! It's famous for having a volcano inside a volcano surrounded by dense jungle. It's also considered the smallest town in Japan and the hardest place in Japan to get to. There is no direct transportation to Aogashima. These facts are what make Aogashima the best kept secret in Tokyo! The island is unspoiled. The pristine jungles and beautiful ocean views are like scenes from the movies. HOW TO GET TO AOGASHIMA Air ▶︎ Haneda Airport (Tokyo) to Hachijojima / 50 minutes ▶︎ Helicopter to Aogashima - 20 minutes / 11,530 Yen Note: You have to take the first flight to catch the helicopter or spend the night. Only 1 helicopter flight per day. Sea (Ferry) ▶︎ Takeshiba Pier (Tokyo) to Hachijojima 11-12 hours / Tokai Kisen Line / ▶︎ Hachijojima to Aogashima / 3 hours / Izu Shoto Kaihatsu Line Note: The ferry to Aogashima is often canceled so don't rely on this if you need to be back to Tokyo for a flight etc. It can be delayed for as long as 1 week depending on weather! WHY IS THIS THE HARDEST PLACE TO GET TO? The town is located 200 meters up off the sea. There is no airport and this island is only accessible by helicopter and ferry. The port is one of the most challenging to dock at in the world so when the sea is rough or the wind is too strong, ferries are often canceled. Visitors may be stranded here for a week or more if the weather turns bad. MUST SEE PLACES on AOGASHIMA ★ Ao-Chu Shochu distillery ★ Aogashima heliport ★ The volcanic island steamer (for lunch) ★ The island sauna ★ Oyamatenbo Park (Observation Area) for the view over the crater and the sky at night ★ Aogashima Port ★ Maruyama & Shrine FOOD TO TRY ★ Torinabe (Chicken Soup Pot) ★ Ashitaba (an island leaf / herb that's used in cooking) ★ Island fish in season Note: you can ask your inn about trying these at scheduled meals THINGS TO NOTE ABOUT VISITING AOGASHIMA 1) You must have a reservation to stay somewhere before arriving. Lodging is limited. Call ahead, even for camping. 2) There is an ATM at the post office but come with cash just in case 3) Helicopters are often sold out a month in advance. Ferry tickets are easy to get but your departure date may not be convenient. 4) Walking is possible everywhere but many tourists rent a car. Other tourists may pick you up if you hitchhike. It takes 80 minutes to walk from the heliport to Aogashima pier. URL: ▶︎ Aogashima's Official Page http://www.vill.aogashima.tokyo.jp/top.html ▶︎ Tokyo's Island Helicopter Service (Online Reservations) http://tohoair-tal.jp/ ▶︎ Ao-chu (青酎) Aogashima Island Shochu Brand http://ao-chu.com/ (Hotel / Inn) Onyado Tomotame / 御宿為朝 telephone: +81 4996-9-0410 owner: Kyoko-san (Japanese only) ▶︎ Aogashimamura Camping Ground telephone: 04996-9-0111  email contact: kankou@vill.aogashima.tokyo.jp Special thank you to Akira-san, Yoshino-san, Kyoko-san and Moemi-san and all the kind residents of Aogashima who made me feel a part of the island family! I stayed on the island from July 23 to July 30. Drone scenes shot with the DJI MAVIC PRO Music Credits: ▷ TEKNOAXE (love his stuff) https://www.youtube.com/user/teknoaxe Jungle - a Royal Feast / Bedtime Story Adventures - Piano/Background ▷ Groovy Baby by Audionautix is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Artist: http://audionautix.com/ ▷ Out of the Skies, Under the Earth by Chris Zabriskie is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Source: http://chriszabriskie.com/reappear/ Artist: http://chriszabriskie.com/ ▷ SUBTITLES: If you'd like to help out and submit a subtitle in your language, I'd really appreciate it so we can reach more people! http://www.youtube.com/timedtext_video?v=-N5pqG7-qDY&ref=share THANK YOU! You'll be listed as a collaborator for this video too :) -john This show has been created and produced by John Daub ジョン・ドーブ. He's been living and working in Japan for over 19 years and regularly reports on TV for Japan's International Channel.

Costa Rica is the world’s largest pineapple producer and Germany’s main supplier of the fruit. Cheap labor and pesticides mean low prices in Western Europe.
While organic pineapples are now being farmed on a larger scale to increasing demand, this likewise has negative consequences for Costa Rica’s ecosystem. Tropical fruits such as pineapples, bananas and kiwis have been available in West European supermarkets for years. But the innocent appearance of these popular products is deceptive. The fruits are cheap because costs are cut in the production countries - affecting wages and health factors. Costa Rica is the world’s largest pineapple producer, and is known both for its exemplary ecological approach and for sustainable tourism. It is in this very country, however, where workers on plantations complain about a lack of rights. Pineapples are grown and harvested here in vast monoculture plantations using huge amounts of pesticides. According to studies conducted by Costa Rica’s national university, the country is not just a major tropical fruit exporter but also the world’s biggest per-hectare user of pesticides. Plantation workers have as a result been reporting rashes and headaches. At the heart of pineapple farming, to the northeast of the capital of San José, trucks regularly have to supply villages with clean drinking water because the groundwater has been contaminated with bromacil - a weed killer banned in the EU. In the north of the country huge pineapple plantations are threatening the livelihoods of traditional small farmers, while conventional banana plantations continue to grow across the southwest. Many supermarkets in Europe have recognized that they can make money with sustainability. Almost all the major chains have signed up to ecological quality seals that stand for responsible growing methods with low pesticide use. The example of Costa Rica, however, shows that such promises aren’t always strictly kept. Although there are farmers who have set up their own businesses with the new growing methods, and although the organic sector in Costa Rica is constantly growing, even organic bananas and pineapples require large areas of land for farming. The result is monocultures with consequences for the ecosystem.
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Exciting, powerful and informative – DW Documentary is always close to current affairs and international events. Our eclectic mix of award-winning films and reports take you straight to the heart of the story. Dive into different cultures, journey across distant lands, and discover the inner workings of modern-day life. Subscribe and explore the world around you – every day, one DW Documentary at a time.

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