The Infinite Hotel Paradox - Jeff Dekofsky

author TED-Ed   5 год. назад
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If you like this video don't forget to like and subscribe http://goo.gl/dgHQSp Michio Kaku is the co-founder of String Field Theory and is the author of international best-selling books such as Hyperspace, Visions, and Beyond Einstein. Michio Kaku is the Henry Semat Professor in Theoretical Physics at the City University of New York. FAIR-USE COPYRIGHT DISCLAIMER * Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, commenting, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. - This video has no negative impact on the original works - This video is also for research and commenting purposes. - It is not transformative in nature. - we only used bits and pieces of videos to get the point across where necessary. If you have any issues with our "Fair Use", please contact us directly, for an amicable and immediate attention. Sciencetodaytv@gmail.com Thank you in advance for your understanding and cooperation.

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The Infinite Hotel, a thought experiment created by German mathematician David Hilbert, is a hotel with an infinite number of rooms. Easy to comprehend, right? Wrong. What if it's completely booked but one person wants to check in? What about 40? Or an infinitely full bus of people? Jeff Dekofsky solves these heady lodging issues using Hilbert's paradox.

Lesson by Jeff Dekofsky, animation by The Moving Company Animation Studio.

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