New York: America's MEGACITY

author The Daily Conversation   12 мес. назад
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TOKYO: Earth's Model MEGACITY

Tokyo is the most successful metropolis in the history of the world with 39 million residents, 50% more people than any other urban area. It is the safest big city on the planet and has a two trillion dollar GDP--an economy larger than all but eight entire countries. More MEGACITIES: https://bit.ly/2NozRJl Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/thedailyconversation Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/thedailyconvo Subscribe to TDC: https://www.youtube.com/TheDailyConversation/ Video by Bryce Plank Drone/helicopter videography courtesy of: https://www.instagram.com/bigheadgregdrone/ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F8wCzbRu2xc Music: "Keep Em Coming" "Where Soul Meets Body" The Muse Maker: www.themusemaker.com https://soundcloud.com/themusemaker YouTube Music Library Media sources used in video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m4YZ1JLeptQ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BYOGClmmeao https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pII_2VbgheI https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eW2-eDiD7w0 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kZ6pa6nYiN4 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ivHbs6DnZ-s https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nrRUdSBARao https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LOR25PjV0wI https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4LDLQ6dGj0U https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f9qQfURhph4 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O4ma1p4DK5A https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ssc5eLjLoMQ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mpzIQt6l4xY https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YNDV6-1bXOg https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9nTlgtf7TME https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LSxPkyZOU7E https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bu0a_qj-T6c https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XKDa0BfUduE https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YfAuGm-w3jc https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UPcAW-rj2bs https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L9F4Mt2tvM0 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7ckvRLHeNlg https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ttPkGSeNu3o https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CsPxjRobjpk https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SQAVPdeoSJs https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0DUlK4KaA_g https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MhBMGMCzUbA https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MhBMGMCzUbA https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3FFMBFNjdXc And the film "Tsukiji Wonderland" Script: Our story begins 561 years ago when a samurai warrior built a castle on the shore of a fishing village called Edo. Its rich soil was ideal for growing rice and attracted farmers from far and wide. In 1600, the great commander Tokugawa Ieyasu won the Battle of Sekigahara, a pivotal moment in history that secured Edo’s status as the most important place in Japan. Unfortunately, the buildings of the expanding city were made of wood and paper, a dangerous combination to confront the warm winds of summer. Legend has it that on one particularly dry afternoon in 1657, a priest made the deadly mistake of burning an unlucky kimono. The fire flared up, ignited his temple, and engulfed 70% of the city. 100,000 people lost their lives. Despite the disaster, by the middle of the 19th century Edo’s population was in the millions. That’s when the military shogunate system that had ruled for almost 700 years ended. A new government led by a young emperor finally made Edo the official capital of Japan, renamed it Tokyo, and made the castle his imperial palace. To celebrate his arrival, everyone toasted with rounds of sake on the house. Around this time Japan opened up to foreign trade and influence, with Tokyo driving the industrial revolution that was modernizing the country. But rapid development had a cost: a strained natural environment. Forests were razed, pollutants choked the air, and Tokyo’s once pristine waterways grew increasingly toxic. It was time for a more conscientious approach. The principle of Satoyama was born, promoting sustainable coexistence with nature, especially in the rice fields covering Japan’s sprawling foothills. Today, a century of conservation has resulted in parks covering 20% of the land in the Tokyo metropolitan area. But while the danger from pollution has been largely overcome, one natural phenomenon poses an unavoidable threat: earthquakes. In 1923, an 8.0 magnitude quake rocked Tokyo, devastating the geologically unstable eastern wards of the city. As firestorms engulfed whole neighborhoods, some took advantage of the chaos to target political enemies and minority groups, like Koreans. When the smoke finally cleared, 140,000 people had perished. Just twenty-two years later, in 1944, Tokyo was hit again. This time from above by allied air forces who waged a relentless nine month campaign that lasted until Japan’s surrender to end WWII following America’s detonation of two atomic weapons on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. On the worst night of the onslaught, 279 Boeing B-29 Superfortress heavy bombers dropped more than 1,600 tons of explosives on Eastern Tokyo... It took generations for Tokyo to completely recover, but today - after more than seven decades at peace - Tokyo is thriving... Zee news says in the newspaper that congress should make hawaii renewable like Japan.

10 BEST THINGS IN NEW YORK CITY (Honest Guide)

Going to New York? Watch our Honest Guide episode to have the best experience. Please SHARE the video with your friends and SUBSCRIBE for more videos like this.We really appreciate your support. Feel free to follow us at instagram: Janek: https://instagram.com/janekrubes/ Honza: https://instagram.com/honzamikulka/ Check out our facebook page here: https://www.facebook.com/HonestPragueGuide/ and let us know what would you like to see If you'd like to send us postcard or anything, you can reach us here: Honest Guide Janek & Honza Radlická 3294/10 150 00, Praha Czech Republic Thank you for your support! Honza Mikulka & Janek Rubeš Stream International

12 of the Worst Places to Live in the U.S.

Get more Tips here! www.destinationtips.com Are you thinking of relocating somewhere in the States? Make sure you take a look at the 12 worst places to live in the U.S. before you make any decisions about your next home base. 12. St. Louis, Missouri Over 14% of St. Louis’ population is living below the poverty line. Out of 100,000 residents, every year 35.3 are murdered, which ranks it as one of America’s most dangerous cities too. 11. Reno, Nevada Reno was the gambling capital of the US until Las Vegas was developed and “The Biggest Little City in the World” has been in economic decline ever since. Reno experiences nearly 39 annual crimes per 1,000 residents. 10. Modesto, California Despite being home to the largest winery in the world, the unemployment rate was nearly 13% in 2014. Modesto ranks number one in the country for car theft and out of 200,000 residents, up to 10,000 are reported to be gang members. 9. Oakland, California The economy in Oakland is strong with a good median household income. ($51,683.) However, home to around 50 gangs and a high violent crime rate, Oakland also suffers from high traffic congestion and poor air quality. 190% worse than the national average. 8. New Orleans, Louisiana The “murder capital of the country," also has one of the worst toxic-substance records. New Orleans has still not recovered from Hurricane Katrina, and was ranked number two in “America’s Dirtiest Cities.” 7. Birmingham, Alabama 27.3% of residents live below the poverty line. Out of every 100,000 residents, 1400 are victims of violent crimes due to the prominent drug trade and high poverty rate. 6. Stockton, California In 2012, the city filed for bankruptcy. Forbes voted Stockton as one of the most dangerous cities in America due to its high crime rates with over 20,000 violent and property crimes committed last year. 5. Memphis, Tennessee Memphis is the largest city on the Mississippi River with over 20% of its inhabitants living below the poverty line. In Memphis you stand a 1 in 12 chance of being a victim of crime. 4. New Haven, Connecticut Home of Yale University, the surrounding areas of New Haven are impoverished and crime ridden. Nearly 68 crimes occur annually for every 1,000 residents. 3. Cleveland, Ohio Aside from being one of the most corrupt cities in the country, Cleveland also has harsh weather conditions, with an average of 60 inches of snowfall each year. 2. Detroit, Michigan The city is suffering from urban decay with over 32% of residents living below the national poverty line. According to FBI Reports, Detroit has the highest rate of violent crime of any city over 200,000. 1. Camden, New Jersey Camden has been on Forbes’ list of “America’s Most Miserable Cities” for years. Riddled with urban decay and political corruption, over 42% of its residents live below the poverty line. It also has 560% more crime than the national average. Where do you think the Worst Place to Live in the U.S. is?

New York City and Los Angeles Compared

M.Laser's video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p2EM8WUfMFc Want your pick for two places to be compared? Your idea gets picked when you donate on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/iammrbeat Or donate on Paypal: https://www.paypal.me/mrbeat Mr. Beat's band: http://electricneedleroom.net/ Mr. Beat on Twitter: https://twitter.com/beatmastermatt Mr. Beat on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/iammrbeat/ Mr. Beat compares and contrasts Los Angeles and New York, the two largest and most influential cities in the United States. All images used under fair use guidelines or found in public domain. Music by Elf Squad: https://dldiedrich2.bandcamp.com/ Thanks to Mr. Betts, Grant Hurst, and the Cynical Historian! Mr. Betts Class: https://www.youtube.com/user/MrBettsClass Grant Hurst: https://www.youtube.com/user/GrantGHurst Cynical Historian: https://www.youtube.com/user/CynicalCypher88 Sources: http://www.laweekly.com/news/news-flash-la-is-actually-bigger-than-new-york-5122287 https://www.bestplaces.net/compare-cities/los_angeles_ca/new_york_ny/economy https://www.forbes.com/places/ca/los-angeles/ https://www.forbes.com/places/ny/new-york/ https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/cities-nationwide-take-notice-los-angeles-just-committed_us_5984ca53e4b0bd8232029774 https://www.quora.com/Which-is-better-New-York-City-or-Los-Angeles-and-why https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Demographics_of_Los_Angeles https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Demographics_of_New_York_City https://la.curbed.com/2012/3/26/10385086/los-angeles-is-the-most-densely-populated-urban-area-in-the-us http://www.laalmanac.com/population/po02.php https://www.kcet.org/shows/lost-la/how-did-hollywood-end-up-in-hollywood https://versus.com/en/new-york-vs-los-angeles http://money.cnn.com/pf/features/lists/taxburden/ https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/why-are-there-palm-trees-in-los-angeles https://www.discoverlosangeles.com/press-releases/facts-about-los-angeles http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-california-mexico-earthquake-20170908-htmlstory.html Photo credits: Chun Yip So DaveofCali Jengod Zenhaus Tuxyso Caleb George Jean-Christophe BENOIST Michael Vadon Anthony Quintano Eli Duke Sam valadi Arnoldius Michael Foran NYC and LA are the two largest cities in the United States. New York has the most people, with a population of 8.5 million, while LA has around 4 million people. The New York metropolitan area, however, has 20.3 million people. So about 1 in 16 Americans live there. The Los Angeles metropolitan area has about 13.1 million people. Both are cosmopolitan, world famous cities. Two cities that never seem to sleep- always hustling and bustling. Over the last century, the two cities have dominated and influenced the culture of the rest of the country. It’s like the two forget the fact that the rest of us exist. You see this on mainstream TV. Most national news and entertainment programming occurs in LA or New York, although LA has way more YouTubers than New York. Both are by oceans. NYC by the Atlantic Ocean, and LA by the Pacific. Both are diverse. We’re talking people flock from all over the world to these two cities to start new lives. More than 37% of New York residents were born in another country. Nearly 40% of LA residents were born in another country. Almost half of the residents of LA are considered either Hispanic or Latino. New York has historically been the main way immigrants come to the United States. In both LA and New York, you’ll see lots of ethnic enclaves, or neighborhoods dominated by one ethnic group. Both tend to have younger residents compared to most other cities around the United States, although LA’s a bit younger. (The median age in New York is about 35.8, while the median age in LA is about 34.6.) It’s really freaking expensive to live in both cities, although LA is about 8.3% less expensive than New York. But it’s a lot more expensive to buy a home in LA. The median household income in both cities is similar. (LA 61,931, NYC 64,605) The unemployment rates and job growth rates are also comparable.(LA 4.2%, NYC 4.2% ) (LA 1.2% job growth, NYC 2% job growth) Related to how expensive it is in both places, of course, is how crowded both cities are. While LA is notorious for its bad traffic, by some metrics New York’s traffic is actually worse. Here’s another surprise. If you look at the entire metro areas, LA, the city known for its sprawl that goes on for miles and miles, has a higher population density than New York. But city proper, ain’t nobody as dense as New York City. We’re talking 27,000 per square mile in NYC versus around 8,000 people per square mile in LA. The average commute time for both cities is way higher than the national average. New Yorkers use more public transportation than LA folks BY FAR. I mean, there’s really no comparison. In LA, people own cars. They drive. In New York, over half of the households don’t own a car. 75% of Manhattan residents don’t.

Highway through a Building Story ★ ONLY in JAPAN

Osaka's Gate Tower Building is an amazing sight to see because ... well, how should I put this? A highway goes through the building. It literally does, and there is a story behind it. In this episode, John not only goes inside to see where the elevator takes him, he also drives through it -- in a Lotus Seven. We'll also go up the Umeda Sky Building and catch some fantastic angles of the city, skyline and Gate Tower Building. THE STORY: Here it is from the building owner. It’s basically a land rights dispute with a sort of happy ending. The property was owned by a business (coal and wood company) since the early Meiji era but when business declined, so did the buildings in the 1970s. The area was approved to be redeveloped in 1983 but the property holder refused to give up the land, even though new building permits had been refused to him. The highway corporation and the property owner negotiated for 5 years and what you see today is their compromise. Highways usually buy the land they’re on but a new law in 1989 allowed the possibility of having two owners on the same spot, really meant for highways to go underground but hey – let’s get creative. The highway is the legal tenant of floors 5 through 7. The current building tenant on the other floors is TKP. WHERE IS THE BUILDING WITH THE HIGHWAY THROUGH IT? Google map: https://goo.gl/maps/qGbpaZ1Ktw12 Closest Station: JR Fukushima Station It's one stop away from JR Osaka Station on the Loop Line. Special thank you to TKP and the building owners for allowing me to film inside the building. URL: https://www.kashikaigishitsu.net/facilitys/gc-osaka-umeda/access/ Thank you to Yasui-san from F-1 BIN Co. for driving me through the building in his LOTUS SEVEN (1996) URL: http://www.f-1bin.co.jp/ Umeda Sky Building: http://www.osaka-info.jp/en/facilities/cat10/post_294.html Important Note: This video and the images were taken by John Daub on location and with permission from the tenants. Use of the video is not permitted without consent of creator. For use of this video or clips, please contact John through the ONLY in JAPAN YouTube channel. MUSIC CREDIT: Odd News by Twin Musicom is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Artist: http://www.twinmusicom.org/ Acid Jazz by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Source: https://freemusicarchive.org/music/Kevin_MacLeod/Jazz_Sampler/AcidJazz_1430 Artist: http://incompetech.com/ This show has been created and produced by John Daub ジョン・ドーブ. He's been living and working in Japan for over 18 years and regularly reports on TV for Japan's International Channel.

The story of New York City, America's megalopolis.
Subscribe to TDC: https://www.youtube.com/TheDailyConversation/

More on New York City's history:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vqYNNOsgpqc

Citizen Jane:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hKjkjntspfA

Video by Bryce Plank
Visualization by Robin West

Music:
Matt Stewart-Evans
https://soundcloud.com/mattstewartevans
Glimpse:
https://soundcloud.com/glimpse_official

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