Built-In Closet Storage Installation

author Bob Vila   3 год. назад
82,598 views

276 Like   23 Dislike

How to Install a Hidden Door/Bookshelf

Watch the full episode: http://www.thisoldhouse.com/toh/tv/ask-toh/video/0,,21007272,00.html Ask This Old House general contractor Tom Silva is in Salem, MA, to help install a bookshelf that doubles as a door. (See below for a shopping list, tools, and steps.) Click here to SUBSCRIBE to the official This Old House YouTube channel: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=thisoldhouse Shopping List for How to Install a Hidden Door/Bookshelf: - Scrap piece of 1x4 poplar wood - Murphy door from kit - Shims - Finishing nails Tools for How to Install a Hidden Door/Bookshelf: - Hammer - Nailset - Pry bar - Levels: 1- or 2-foot and 6-foot - Scribes - Circular saw - Wood glue - Drill/driver - Utility knife Steps for How to Install a Hidden Door/Bookshelf: 1. Remove current door from its hinges by popping up the pins with a hammer and nailset. 2. Remove the old jamb and casing with a pry bar. 3. To level the jamb, place a piece of poplar on the floor and make it level. Set your scribes the overall width of the filler and drag the scribes along the piece of poplar. 4. After marking the poplar, cut it with the circular saw, following the scribe line you traced. 5. Using wood glue, glue the poplar filler piece to the underside of the doorjamb to fill the gap. 6. Repeat the same steps to fill the back side of the jamb. 7. Move the jamb from the door kit into place. Using a 6-foot level, check that it’s plumb; if it needs adjusting, place shims between the jamb and the wall studs until the jamb is plumb. Drill through the jamb and shims, and secure with screws. 8. Using a utility knife and a hammer, remove the excess shims on either side. 9. Lift up the bookshelf and place in the pre-fashioned pivot-point pinholes on the top and bottom of the jamb. 10. Glue trim to the jamb and secure with finishing nails. Follow This Old House and Ask This Old House: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ThisOldHouse Twitter: https://twitter.com/thisoldhouse https://twitter.com/asktoh Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/thisoldhouse/ G+: https://plus.google.com/+thisoldhouse/posts Instagram: http://instagram.com/thisoldhouse Tumblr: http://thisoldhouse.tumblr.com/

37 TOTALLY BRILLIANT HOME REPAIR TRICKS

Subscribe to 5-Minute Crafts: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC  For copyright matters please contact us at: welcome@brightside.me ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/5min.crafts/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/5.min.crafts/ The Bright Side of Youtube: https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/ Music: 1. Cool Rock - Take the Lead by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1100279 Artist: http://incompetech.com/ 2. Whatdafunk by Audionautix is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Artist: http://audionautix.com/ 3. Funkorama by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1100474 Artist: http://incompetech.com/ 4. Skinny Leonard by Audionautix is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Artist: http://audionautix.com/ 5. 64 Sundays by Twin Musicom is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Artist: http://www.twinmusicom.org/ 6. Feelin Good by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1100475 Artist: http://incompetech.com/ 7. Yeah Yeah by Audionautix is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Artist: http://audionautix.com/

How to Build Walk-in Closet Storage | This Old House

This Old House general contractor Tom Silva and host Kevin O'Connor build a storage system for a walk-in closet. (See below for a shopping list and tools.) Click here to SUBSCRIBE to the official This Old House YouTube channel: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=thisoldhouse Full episode: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-fNTeCMbLCI&index=26&list=PLkJADc1qDrr-ZmCu0t_YNmTXHVt80JDyE How to Install a Garage Storage System: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RBFjI95S89E&list=PLkJADc1qDrr_0NxtmzECiOWkr5de82kXV&index=90 How to Install Kitchen Cabinets: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3koRhM6CKNU&list=PLkJADc1qDrr_0NxtmzECiOWkr5de82kXV&index=73 How to Install a Fiberglass Tub Surround: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_TEVf4DubtI&list=PLkJADc1qDrr_0NxtmzECiOWkr5de82kXV&index=3 Shopping List for How to Build Walk-in Closet Storage: - ¾-inch birch plywood, for building the cabinet, shelves and dividers - 13/16-inch-wide iron-on veneer, for adhering to the edges of the plywood top - ½-inch birch plywood, for the cabinet backs - fold-down wardrobe lift, used to make clothes more easily accessible5. Clothes rod, for hanging clothes - slide-out shoe rack and pants rack, for neatly organizing shoes and pants - assorted drywall screws, for assembling and installing cabinets Tools for How to Build Walk-in Closet Storage: - portable circular saw and straightedge guide, used to cut plywood parts to size - router, used for cutting rabbets and dadoes - drill/driver, used for drilling holes and driving screws - jigsaw, used for making haunch cuts in shelves - random-orbit sander, used for smoothing wood surfaces - clothes iron, used to adhere iron-on veneer to plywood edges - clamps, used to hold straightedge guide in place during cutting - sanding block and 120-grit sandpaper, used for sanding veneer flush Follow This Old House: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ThisOldHouse Twitter: https://twitter.com/thisoldhouse Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/thisoldhouse/ G+: https://plus.google.com/+thisoldhouse/posts Instagram: http://instagram.com/thisoldhouse Tumblr: http://thisoldhouse.tumblr.com/

Amazing Technique Smart Woodworking Skillful - Building And Assemble A Big Front Door Beautiful

Amazing Technique Smart Woodworking Skillful - Building And Assemble A Big Front Door Beautiful Thanks for watching, subscribe & share! ► All things for you: https://goo.gl/32CC43 ► Subscribe to channel: https://goo.gl/5aOHWB

How to Trim a Coat Closet

Watch the full episode: http://www.thisoldhouse.com/toh/tv/ask-toh/video/0,,20986158,00.html Ask This Old House general contractor Tom Silva trims a coat closet by installing a clothes rod and shelf. (See below for a shopping list, tools, and steps.) Click here to SUBSCRIBE to the official This Old House YouTube channel: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=thisoldhouse Shopping List for How to Trim a Coat Closet: - 1x5 clear pine - 1x12 clear pine - Metal clothes rod - Clothes-rod bracket - Construction adhesive Tools for How to Trim a Coat Closet: - Driver - Miter saw - Nail gun or hammer - Reciprocating saw - Caulk gun Steps for How to Trim a Coat Closet: 1. Use a stud finder to locate studs in the closet walls. 2. Cut three pieces of 1x5 pine to measured length using the miter saw. 3. Nail pine pieces together using a nail gun or hammer to assemble the shelf cleat. 4. Screw the two clothes-rod brackets to opposite ends of the cleat assembly using a driver. 5. Measure 5’4” off the floor and draw a straight line across all three sides using a level. 6. Dab construction adhesive with the caulk gun to the inside of the wall where the cleat will sit. 7. Line up the cleat to match the top of the level line. 8. Nail the cleat to the studs using a nail gun or hammer. 9. Cut the clothes rod to measured length using a reciprocating saw. 10. Measure across the top of the cleat to figure out the desired length for shelf. 11. Mark the measurement on 1x12 pine and cut it to length using the miter saw. 12. Place the pine shelf on top of the cleat and nail it to the cleat using a nail gun or hammer. Follow This Old House and Ask This Old House: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ThisOldHouse Twitter: https://twitter.com/thisoldhouse https://twitter.com/asktoh Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/thisoldhouse/ G+: https://plus.google.com/+thisoldhouse/posts Instagram: http://instagram.com/thisoldhouse Tumblr: http://thisoldhouse.tumblr.com/

Bob and carpenter Bob Ryley are working in the master bedroom building two storage units in the walk-in closet.

Comments for video: